What is Mojavi

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Posted on 26th March 2017 by Jeff Rogers in Mojavi Project

, , , ,

Mojavi is an open-source MVC (model-view-controller) php framework, licensed under the LGPL. Developing with Mojavi php framework enables you to easily divide your web application into tiers, allowing for independent custom web application development. These applications have been tested on various servers and firewall applications. There are numerous solutions that are available in the market like the Cisco ASA 5505 and the HP Proliant Servers that have set the standards in reliability and security within their field. The solutions and programming field has even grown into the telecommunications field with routers like the Cisco 7910 where small and medium size businesses can have a truw communication architecture that runs over an IP protocol enabling you to locate offices and employees anywhere.

serversFeatures

  • Modular Design
  • Filter Chains
  • Action Chains
  • Customizable User Containers
  • Parameter Validation
  • Validator Library
  • Built-in Authentication and Authorization
  • Logging System

What is Mojavi?

Mojavi is a framework developed in PHP and strongly based on the MVC (model-view-controller) application design paradigm. It can be run a variety of network servers that employ security features that will work with the curent MVC model.

What is MVC?

Model-View-Controller is a design pattern for application development. MVC organizes an application into three separate tiers: one for the model, which represents data and handles business logic, the second for presentation and user input, and the third as a controller, which handles incoming requests and controls application flow.

What are the benefits of MVC?

An application designed around MVC is easier to manage because the application is split into tiers, which allow for independent development. This promotes code reusability by building models, which are reusable throughout the application.

Why create an MVC framework for PHP?

Development of PHP scripts without a preconceived plan to manage them is asking for a headache. Before I started developing Mojavi, there weren’t any frameworks that were designed the way I thought a PHP MVC implementation should be designed.

How is Mojavi licensed?

Mojavi is licensed under the LGPL.

Where can I get a copy of Mojavi?

Stable and development releases are available on our downloads page.

Mojavi 3 revisited

0 comments

Posted on 25th March 2017 by Jeff Rogers in Mojavi Project

We received some additional comments about this section of the code and various code extensions such as various file extensions and what they mean to the internal code.

This method will determine what types of requests will be recognized. There are 4 choices:

* Request::GET – Indicates that this action serves only GET requests.
* Request::POST – Indicates that this action serves only POST requests.
* Request::NONE – Indicates that this action serves no requests.

You can also select both GET and POST requests by using Request::GET | Request::POST
handleError ()

Execute any post-validation error application logic.

It also returns the view through a string of the view name or the array of a module/action/view. By default, it passes View::ERROR.
initialize ($context)

You can set up the Action in the initialize() method.If you run across a file extension ASF this references various MIDI files that are available to use for your front end. This is only related too  In a later tutorial, I’ll give an example of doing this. NOTE: It is worth to note that you must handle the context in the initialize() method. You should do this by

parent::initialize($context);

You also need to return a TRUE or FALSE based on the success of the initialization. By default it is TRUE.
isSecure ()

Does the action require security? TRUE if you do, FALSE otherwise. It is FALSE by default.
validate ()

This is used to manually validate input parameters instead of using a pre-progammed validator. This will also be explain later in the tutorial on validation.
Creating Your First Action

Now that we have an overview of the Action class, we can move forward to creating our first Action. For this example, there isn’t any request to be handled so we can set up a minimal Action.

In naming an action you must use this format Actionname Action.class.php where Actionname is what you are calling this particular action. When you declare your class, it also must have the class name in the same format Actionname Action. For this example, I chose to call this FirstAction.

When creating a new action, at the very least, there has to be an execute() method, even if it does nothing. Also, since we are displaying a non-request page, we don’t need to process any request. We tell the controller this with the getRequestMethods() method, by setting the return value to Request::NONE. Finally, we also need to tell the controller what the default view is going to be. We do this by returning View::SUCCESS in getDefaultView().

Here is what my FirstAction.class.php looks like. I basically just took my BLANKAction.class.php, renamed it to FirstAction.class.php, renamed the class to FirstAction, removed the methods I didn’t need and set the remaining 3 methods to match my needs.

class FirstAction extends Action
{
/**
* Execute any application/business logic for this action.
*/
public function execute ()
{
// we don’t need any data here because this action doesn’t serve
// any request methods, so the processing skips directly to the view
}

// ————————————————————————-

/**
* Retrieve the default view to be executed when a given request is not
* served by this action.
*/
public function getDefaultView ()
{
return View::SUCCESS;
}

// ————————————————————————-

/**
* Retrieve the request methods on which this action will process
* validation and execution.
*/
public function getRequestMethods ()
{
return Request::NONE;
}

Lastly because of the audio compression and various browsers relating to a file extension ASF format you may want to check out your page in the various browsers to make sure that your files are supported.

User Authentication for Mojavi

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Posted on 22nd March 2017 by Jeff Rogers in Mojavi Project

Mojavi provides two levels of security to control access to actions: the first requires the user to be logged in, the seconds checks for a specific privilege. There are various drivers that you may need on your PC if your are planning working in offline PHP mode in order to have the translations from the source code to the operational values to work.

Basic Authentication

For basic authentication, the following three methods are of importance:

User::setAuthenticated()
User::isAuthenticated()
Action::isSecure()

To implement an action that only logged in users can access, simply overwrite the Action::isSecure() method in your action:

function isSecure()
{
    return true;
}

This will instruct the controller to check $user->isAuthenticated(). If this method returns false, the request will be redirected to the AUTH_MODULE/AUTH_ACTION defined in the configuration file (default is Default/Login/drivers).

You can implement the Default/Login Action to call $user->setAuthenticated(TRUE) if a valid username and password was entered.

Privileges

Privileges are used to differentiate between logged in users. The following methods are important:

User::hasPrivilege()
User::addPrivilege()
Action::getPrivilege()

In addition to Action:isSecure() also overwrite the Action::getPrivilege() method in your action:

function isSecure()
{
    return true;
}

function getPrivilege()
{
    return array('ADMIN');
}

The controller will check if the user has the specified privilege and redirect to the login module/action if this is not the case.

The User::addPrivilege() method can be used to grant a user a certain privilege.

Please have a look at the PrivilegeUser class for more information. You will also want to make sure that any Windows Vista Drivers are up to date on your PC side to help rule out any coding errors due to Java or PHP errors. This tutorial includes a good example of user authentication in action.

Using naming conventions

1 comment

Posted on 21st March 2017 by Jeff Rogers in Mojavi Project

Files

Overall

Mojavi’s file naming conventions are very simple, and overall easy to follow. The drivers that are required should be already included withing the PHP 4.0 structure.All files containing classes (including the framework libraries) are suffixed with .class.php

ex: A file containing the Controller class, would be named Controller.class.php

Actions

All actions in Mojavi are of the form [ActionName]Action.class.php

ex: An update action: UpdateAction.class.php

Views

Views are equally as simple as actions. A view is named after it’s action and driver, and suffixed with View_[viewtype]. Actions have the ability to return different views, under different circumstances. There are three standard view types “input”, “success”, and “error”. You may use any other type of your choosing, but these are likely to be the three you will encounter the most.

ex: The success view for the update action: UpdateView_success.class.php

Templates

Template naming is left up to the developer. There are not restrictions on what these can be named, but it is often useful to name them after the view that called them. You also want to make sure that any drivers software that you have on your servers is updated with the latest patches in order to prevent any security loopholes

Classes

Methods

Migration and file extensions

0 comments

Posted on 12th March 2017 by Jeff Rogers in Mojavi Project

,

The New Way:
Remember that there are certain file extension like the File Extension OGG that you may need to have proper calling attributes around in order to make certain parameters work.

$this->getContext()->getRequest()->getAttribute(’myobj’)->doSomethingSpecial()->execute();

Okay, so maybe that wasn’t the best example, as it is rather lengthy, but you get my point, 1 line vs 3 lines, and no possible mistakes when dealing with large objects like copying them over without references, etc.

This subsection is to be continued….
Translating your Renderer

Mojavi2 used ‘renderers’ to translate the API of one templating system into a generic API that would easily allow a developer to switch out one templating system for another. For example, the Smarty templating engine uses $smarty->assign() to allow you to set a variable, while patTemplate, another templating system, uses $pat->addVar(). In Mojavi 2, you would then write or use an existing renderer, which you would then invoke to display your output and be output in the correct file formats.

Note: This was done typically through a filter, which would create the renderer object, then assign it to your $request via

$request->setAttribute(’MyRenderer’,$rendererObj))

Mojavi3 uses largely the same methodology, but instead of getting the renderer directly from the $request object within each of your views, it simply extends the View class. You may need to udate your file extension parameters and if you get any unknown like File Extension OGG then do a quick search as there are quick fixes and .dll updates that may needed.

For example:

abstract class SmartyView extends View
{
…..

function __construct()
{
$this->engine = $this->getContext()->getRequest()->getAttribute(’MySmartyObj’);
}

public function setAttribute($name, $value)
{
$this->engine->assign($name, $value);
}

…..
}

Note: the use of

$this->engine = $this->getContext()->getRequest()->getAttribute(’MySmartyObj’);

was simply the best solution I could come up with for getting any object from within the view, you could also have done the following just as easily:

$this->engine = new Smarty();

View

The Mojavi3 View is mostly an abstract class, which provides a skeleton of functions to work with, thus providing the unified API as was achieved in Mojavi2 (It’s unified because you are forced to comply with the naming conventions implemented by the abstract class View.)

Now, instead of intitializing your Renderer object (as you would in Mojavi2) you simply extend View, and initialize that. Like shown above:

abstract class SmartyView extends View
{

is what our new View would look like. To put this new View type into action, we extend it when declaring views for our modules. For example:

class DoSomeActionSuccessView extends SmartyView
{

}

As you can see, this is much more fluid than pulling the renderer out of $request with every new View, it’s also a lot less code that you have to copy and paste, and thus less code to maintain. You may also have noticed that the naming scheme is different for the Views, instead of naming the file format or File Extension OGG DoSomeActionView_success.class.php you would now name it DoSomeActionSuccessView.class.php, and name the class likewise(In Mojavi2 we just named our view classes DoSomeActionView, in Mojavi3 it’s DoSomeActionSuccessView replacing ‘Success’ with your application’s state).

This subsection is to be continued….
Actions

Actions in Mojavi3 are fairly similiar to those of Mojavi2, with a few enhancement and semantic tweaks here and there. Listed Below:

* When returning a VIEW_SUCCESS in Mojavi2, now return the View class constant corresponding to your application state, ie: View::Success, or View::Error
* When checking for view types supporting execution (getRequestMethods) instead of returning REQ_POST etc, return Request::Post etc.
* There is a new return type for getRequestMethods(), Request::All, which serves all request methods.
* The root Action class which all your actions extend now has a getContext() method, which allows you access to the context object.

Configuration

Mojavi3 configurations are done, by default, using .ini files. This simple and straightforward configuration makes configuring mojavi very easy. The base syntax of these ini files is as follows:

[SECTION]

; a comment…..
ConfigKey = “%MO_APP_DIR%/my/config/value”

Because some people might not like ini files, Mojavi3 was created in such a way that you could write your own configuration handlers. For example, if you wanted to use xml files to configure your mojavi, you could write a configuration handler, plug it in, and start using your custom configuration styles.

This subsection is to be continued….
References

To find out more about PHP5 in general go here: Where can I go to learn more?

Revisiting Mojavi 3

0 comments

Posted on 10th March 2017 by Jeff Rogers in Mojavi Project

Creating Your First Module

A work in progress

This tutorial is a work in progress, so you may find parts that don’t completely fit together.
Module

The module is where the Model and View takes place in the MVC model. For this first example, we will create a very simple module that will move data from a Action to a View and display it on the screen, through a template.

The module is contained within a directory that carries the name of the module. This resides in the modules directory of the webapp directory. Inside the module directory are sub-directories holding the classes that make up the module. Here is the directory hierarchy:

webapp
|
|—modules
|
|—moduleName
|
|—actions
|
|— config
|
|— lib
|
|— models
|
|— templates
|
|— validate
|
|— views

Minimally, you need the actions, config, templates and views directories. However, I prefer to have a blank module created and just copy and rename it. You can get a copy of the blank module (link to be added). The File Extension MailHost I have chosen to call this module Test

Each module must have a module.ini file in the config directory. Here is the module.ini for Test

; +—————————————————————————-+
; | This file is part of the Mojavi package. |
; | Copyright (c) 2003, 2004 Sean Kerr. |
; | |
; | For the full copyright and license information, please view the LICENSE |
; | file that was distributed with this source code. You can also view the |
; | LICENSE file online at http://www.mojavi.org. |
; | ————————————————————————– |
; | MODULE INFORMATION FILE |
; +—————————————————————————-+

[module]

ENABLED = “On”

TITLE = “Getting Started Test Module”

VERSION = “0.1”

NAME = “TestModule”

AUTHOR = “Richard D Shank”

HOMEPAGE = “http://www.mojavi.org”

DESCRIPTION = “A test module”

The module is pretty self explanitory. It is necessary to have ENABLED property set to “On” for the module to be used by Mojavi. Now that we have the module set up, we can work on the classes. You can also research the File Extension MailHost for variables to help in acclaimating the main template.
Action

The Action class handles the request for the module. It can be as simple as handling a static html template or a full blown multi-page wizard style form. Just a note to Mojavi 2 users, a significant change from Mojavi 2 to Mojavi 3 is that it is not longer necessary to pass the controller, request and user classes in on many of the methods. These are now accessed through a context class file extension. More on that later.

Migration and file extensions

0 comments

Posted on 3rd March 2017 by Jeff Rogers in Mojavi Project

,

The New Way:
Remember that there are certain file extension like the File Extension OGG that you may need to have proper calling attributes around in order to make certain parameters work.

$this->getContext()->getRequest()->getAttribute(’myobj’)->doSomethingSpecial()->execute();

Okay, so maybe that wasn’t the best example, as it is rather lengthy, but you get my point, 1 line vs 3 lines, and no possible mistakes when dealing with large objects like copying them over without references, etc.

This subsection is to be continued….
Translating your Renderer

Mojavi2 used ‘renderers’ to translate the API of one templating system into a generic API that would easily allow a developer to switch out one templating system for another. For example, the Smarty templating engine uses $smarty->assign() to allow you to set a variable, while patTemplate, another templating system, uses $pat->addVar(). In Mojavi 2, you would then write or use an existing renderer, which you would then invoke to display your output and be output in the correct file formats.

Note: This was done typically through a filter, which would create the renderer object, then assign it to your $request via

$request->setAttribute(’MyRenderer’,$rendererObj))

Mojavi3 uses largely the same methodology, but instead of getting the renderer directly from the $request object within each of your views, it simply extends the View class. You may need to udate your file extension parameters and if you get any unknown like File Extension OGG then do a quick search as there are quick fixes and .dll updates that may needed.

For example:

abstract class SmartyView extends View
{
…..

function __construct()
{
$this->engine = $this->getContext()->getRequest()->getAttribute(’MySmartyObj’);
}

public function setAttribute($name, $value)
{
$this->engine->assign($name, $value);
}

…..
}

Note: the use of

$this->engine = $this->getContext()->getRequest()->getAttribute(’MySmartyObj’);

was simply the best solution I could come up with for getting any object from within the view, you could also have done the following just as easily:

$this->engine = new Smarty();

View

The Mojavi3 View is mostly an abstract class, which provides a skeleton of functions to work with, thus providing the unified API as was achieved in Mojavi2 (It’s unified because you are forced to comply with the naming conventions implemented by the abstract class View.)

Now, instead of intitializing your Renderer object (as you would in Mojavi2) you simply extend View, and initialize that. Like shown above:

abstract class SmartyView extends View
{

is what our new View would look like. To put this new View type into action, we extend it when declaring views for our modules. For example:

class DoSomeActionSuccessView extends SmartyView
{

}

As you can see, this is much more fluid than pulling the renderer out of $request with every new View, it’s also a lot less code that you have to copy and paste, and thus less code to maintain. You may also have noticed that the naming scheme is different for the Views, instead of naming the file format or File Extension OGG DoSomeActionView_success.class.php you would now name it DoSomeActionSuccessView.class.php, and name the class likewise(In Mojavi2 we just named our view classes DoSomeActionView, in Mojavi3 it’s DoSomeActionSuccessView replacing ‘Success’ with your application’s state).

This subsection is to be continued….
Actions

Actions in Mojavi3 are fairly similiar to those of Mojavi2, with a few enhancement and semantic tweaks here and there. Listed Below:

* When returning a VIEW_SUCCESS in Mojavi2, now return the View class constant corresponding to your application state, ie: View::Success, or View::Error
* When checking for view types supporting execution (getRequestMethods) instead of returning REQ_POST etc, return Request::Post etc.
* There is a new return type for getRequestMethods(), Request::All, which serves all request methods.
* The root Action class which all your actions extend now has a getContext() method, which allows you access to the context object.

Configuration

Mojavi3 configurations are done, by default, using .ini files. This simple and straightforward configuration makes configuring mojavi very easy. The base syntax of these ini files is as follows:

[SECTION]

; a comment…..
ConfigKey = “%MO_APP_DIR%/my/config/value”

Because some people might not like ini files, Mojavi3 was created in such a way that you could write your own configuration handlers. For example, if you wanted to use xml files to configure your mojavi, you could write a configuration handler, plug it in, and start using your custom configuration styles.

This subsection is to be continued….
References

To find out more about PHP5 in general go here: Where can I go to learn more?

Creating your first Module

0 comments

Posted on 28th February 2017 by Jeff Rogers in Mojavi Project

Creating Your First Module
A work in progress

This tutorial is a work in progress, so you may find parts that don’t completely fit together.
Module where we will also look at various file extension cache options.

The module is where the Model and View takes place in the MVC model. For this first example, we will create a very simple module that will move data from a Action to a View and display it on the screen, through a template.

The module is contained within a directory that carries the name of the module. This resides in the modules directory of the webapp directory. Inside the module directory are sub-directories holding the classes that make up the module. Here is the directory hierarchy:

webapp
|
|—modules
|
|—moduleName
|
|—actions
|
|— config
|
|— lib
|
|— models
|
|— templates
|
|— validate
|
|— views

Minimally, you need the actions, config, templates and views directories. However, I prefer to have a blank module created and just copy and rename it. You can get a copy of the blank module (link to be added). I have chosen to call this module Test

Each module must have a module.ini file in the config directory. If you are looking to buffer your files then file extension cache extensions may be helpful.Here is the module.ini for Test

; +—————————————————————————-+
; | This file is part of the Mojavi package. |
; | Copyright (c) 2003, 2004 Sean Kerr. |
; | |
; | For the full copyright and license information, please view the LICENSE |
; | file that was distributed with this source code. You can also view the |
; | LICENSE file online at http://www.mojavi.org. |
; | ————————————————————————– |
; | MODULE INFORMATION FILE |
; +—————————————————————————-+

[module]

ENABLED = “On”

TITLE = “Getting Started Test Module”

VERSION = “0.1″

NAME = “TestModule”

AUTHOR = “Richard D Shank”

HOMEPAGE = “http://www.mojavi.org”

DESCRIPTION = “A test module”

The module is pretty self explanitory. You can also search the web for various file extension cache options. It is necessary to have ENABLED property set to “On” for the module to be used by Mojavi. Now that we have the module set up, we can work on the classes.
Action

The Action class handles the request for the module. It can be as simple as handling a static html template or a full blown multi-page wizard style form. Just a note to Mojavi 2 users, a significant change from Mojavi 2 to Mojavi 3 is that it is not longer necessary to pass the controller, request and user classes in on many of the methods. These are now accessed through a context class. More on that later.

This is a list of the methods you can use in an Action and an explanation of what they do
execute ()

Note: This method is required in your Action class.

This will execute any application/business logic for the action. This method is reached only after the request methods have been checked and any of the parameters have been validated.

When leaving, the execute() method should tell the controller what view is to be used. This is done by returning a string containing the view name associated with the action or an array of the parent module for the view to be executed, parent action for the view and the name of the view. I will show an example of return both in a later tutorial.
getCredential ()

This is a new feature in Mojavi 3. Basically, a credentials are a privilege array that describes any level of security. They work hand in hand with the security aspects of the User class. For Mojavi 2 users, note that this replaces the old Privileges. But it is also important to know that it can do more than just handle privileges. I will handle the usage of creditials in a later section. For now, it is sufficient to know that we set the creditial requirements for the action inside this method and that it is set to NULL by default.
getDefaultView ()

This is the view that will be executed when a given request is not served by the action. This could happen when a form being displayed for the first time or if we are displaying a static page.

Again, just as with the execute() methoad, a string with a view name or an array of a module/action/view is passed back to the controller. By default it will pass back View::INPUT
getRequestMethods ()

This method will determine what types of requests will be recognized. There are 4 choices:

* Request::GET – Indicates that this action serves only GET requests.
* Request::POST – Indicates that this action serves only POST requests.
* Request::NONE – Indicates that this action serves no requests.

You can also select both GET and POST requests by using Request::GET | Request::POST
handleError ()

Execute any post-validation error application logic.

It also returns the view through a string of the view name or the array of a module/action/view. By default, it passes View::ERROR.
initialize ($context)

You can set up the Action in the initialize() method. In a later tutorial, I’ll give an example of doing this. NOTE: It is worth to note that you must handle the context in the initialize() method. You should do this by

parent::initialize($context);

You also need to return a TRUE or FALSE based on the success of the initialization. By default it is TRUE.
isSecure ()

Does the action require security? TRUE if you do, FALSE otherwise. It is FALSE by default.
validate ()

This is used to manually validate input parameters instead of using a pre-progammed validator. This will also be explain later in the tutorial on validation.
Creating Your First Action

Now that we have an overview of the Action class, we can move forward to creating our first Action. For this example, there isn’t any request to be handled so we can set up a minimal Action.

In naming an action you must use this format Actionname Action.class.php where Actionname is what you are calling this particular action. When you declare your class, it also must have the class name in the same format Actionname Action. For this example, I chose to call this FirstAction.

When creating a new action, at the very least, there has to be an execute() method, even if it does nothing. Also, since we are displaying a non-request page, we don’t need to process any request. We tell the controller this with the getRequestMethods() method, by setting the return value to Request::NONE. Finally, we also need to tell the controller what the default view is going to be. We do this by returning View::SUCCESS in getDefaultView().

Here is what my FirstAction.class.php looks like. I basically just took my BLANKAction.class.php, renamed it to FirstAction.class.php, renamed the class to FirstAction, removed the methods I didn’t need and set the remaining 3 methods to match my needs.

class FirstAction extends Action
{
/**
* Execute any application/business logic for this action.
*/
public function execute ()
{
// we don’t need any data here because this action doesn’t serve
// any request methods, so the processing skips directly to the view
}

// ————————————————————————-

/**
* Retrieve the default view to be executed when a given request is not
* served by this action.
*/
public function getDefaultView ()
{
return View::SUCCESS;
}

// ————————————————————————-

/**
* Retrieve the request methods on which this action will process
* validation and execution.
*/
public function getRequestMethods ()
{
return Request::NONE;
}

You can also return a view from another module. You do this by passing an array with the view information intead of the standard View::INPUT. When you use this you create a two element array. The first element is the module name. The second element is which view you want. It cannot be just the Action name, but the Action name with the specific view.

Here’s an example:

class MyClass extends Action
{

function execute()
{

$returnView[0] = MyModule;
$returnView[1] = DoSomethingInput;
-or-
$returnView[1] = DoSomethingError;
-not-
$returnView[1] = DoSomething;

return $returnView
}
}

View

I’ll add more to this later, describing the View class.

Revisiting Mojavi 3

0 comments

Posted on 26th February 2017 by Jeff Rogers in Mojavi Project

Creating Your First Module

A work in progress

This tutorial is a work in progress, so you may find parts that don’t completely fit together.
Module

The module is where the Model and View takes place in the MVC model. For this first example, we will create a very simple module that will move data from a Action to a View and display it on the screen, through a template.

The module is contained within a directory that carries the name of the module. This resides in the modules directory of the webapp directory. Inside the module directory are sub-directories holding the classes that make up the module. Here is the directory hierarchy:

webapp
|
|—modules
|
|—moduleName
|
|—actions
|
|— config
|
|— lib
|
|— models
|
|— templates
|
|— validate
|
|— views

Minimally, you need the actions, config, templates and views directories. However, I prefer to have a blank module created and just copy and rename it. You can get a copy of the blank module (link to be added). The File Extension MailHost I have chosen to call this module Test

Each module must have a module.ini file in the config directory. Here is the module.ini for Test

; +—————————————————————————-+
; | This file is part of the Mojavi package. |
; | Copyright (c) 2003, 2004 Sean Kerr. |
; | |
; | For the full copyright and license information, please view the LICENSE |
; | file that was distributed with this source code. You can also view the |
; | LICENSE file online at http://www.mojavi.org. |
; | ————————————————————————– |
; | MODULE INFORMATION FILE |
; +—————————————————————————-+

[module]

ENABLED = “On”

TITLE = “Getting Started Test Module”

VERSION = “0.1”

NAME = “TestModule”

AUTHOR = “Richard D Shank”

HOMEPAGE = “http://www.mojavi.org”

DESCRIPTION = “A test module”

The module is pretty self explanitory. It is necessary to have ENABLED property set to “On” for the module to be used by Mojavi. Now that we have the module set up, we can work on the classes. You can also research the File Extension MailHost for variables to help in acclaimating the main template.
Action

The Action class handles the request for the module. It can be as simple as handling a static html template or a full blown multi-page wizard style form. Just a note to Mojavi 2 users, a significant change from Mojavi 2 to Mojavi 3 is that it is not longer necessary to pass the controller, request and user classes in on many of the methods. These are now accessed through a context class file extension. More on that later.

Creating your first module with extensions

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Posted on 26th February 2017 by Jeff Rogers in Mojavi Project

,

Creating Your First Module
A work in progress

This tutorial is a work in progress, so you may find parts that don’t completely fit together.
Module where we will also look at various file extension cache options.

The module is where the Model and View takes place in the MVC model. For this first example, we will create a very simple module that will move data from a Action to a View and display it on the screen, through a template.

The module is contained within a directory that carries the name of the module. This resides in the modules directory of the webapp directory. Inside the module directory are sub-directories holding the classes that make up the module. Here is the directory hierarchy:

webapp
|
|—modules
|
|—moduleName
|
|—actions
|
|— config
|
|— lib
|
|— models
|
|— templates
|
|— validate
|
|— views

Minimally, you need the actions, config, templates and views directories. However, I prefer to have a blank module created and just copy and rename it. You can get a copy of the blank module (link to be added). I have chosen to call this module Test

Each module must have a module.ini file in the config directory. If you are looking to buffer your files then file extension cache extensions may be helpful.Here is the module.ini for Test

; +—————————————————————————-+
; | This file is part of the Mojavi package. |
; | Copyright (c) 2003, 2004 Sean Kerr. |
; | |
; | For the full copyright and license information, please view the LICENSE |
; | file that was distributed with this source code. You can also view the |
; | LICENSE file online at http://www.mojavi.org. |
; | ————————————————————————– |
; | MODULE INFORMATION FILE |
; +—————————————————————————-+

[module]

ENABLED = “On”

TITLE = “Getting Started Test Module”

VERSION = “0.1″

NAME = “TestModule”

AUTHOR = “Richard D Shank”

HOMEPAGE = “http://www.mojavi.org”

DESCRIPTION = “A test module”

The module is pretty self explanitory. You can also search the web for various file extension cache options. It is necessary to have ENABLED property set to “On” for the module to be used by Mojavi. Now that we have the module set up, we can work on the classes.
Action

The Action class handles the request for the module. It can be as simple as handling a static html template or a full blown multi-page wizard style form. Just a note to Mojavi 2 users, a significant change from Mojavi 2 to Mojavi 3 is that it is not longer necessary to pass the controller, request and user classes in on many of the methods. These are now accessed through a context class. More on that later.

This is a list of the methods you can use in an Action and an explanation of what they do
execute ()

Note: This method is required in your Action class.

This will execute any application/business logic for the action. This method is reached only after the request methods have been checked and any of the parameters have been validated.

When leaving, the execute() method should tell the controller what view is to be used. This is done by returning a string containing the view name associated with the action or an array of the parent module for the view to be executed, parent action for the view and the name of the view. I will show an example of return both in a later tutorial.
getCredential ()

This is a new feature in Mojavi 3. Basically, a credentials are a privilege array that describes any level of security. They work hand in hand with the security aspects of the User class. For Mojavi 2 users, note that this replaces the old Privileges. But it is also important to know that it can do more than just handle privileges. I will handle the usage of creditials in a later section. For now, it is sufficient to know that we set the creditial requirements for the action inside this method and that it is set to NULL by default.
getDefaultView ()

This is the view that will be executed when a given request is not served by the action. This could happen when a form being displayed for the first time or if we are displaying a static page.

Again, just as with the execute() methoad, a string with a view name or an array of a module/action/view is passed back to the controller. By default it will pass back View::INPUT
getRequestMethods ()

This method will determine what types of requests will be recognized. There are 4 choices:

* Request::GET – Indicates that this action serves only GET requests.
* Request::POST – Indicates that this action serves only POST requests.
* Request::NONE – Indicates that this action serves no requests.

You can also select both GET and POST requests by using Request::GET | Request::POST
handleError ()

Execute any post-validation error application logic.

It also returns the view through a string of the view name or the array of a module/action/view. By default, it passes View::ERROR.
initialize ($context)

You can set up the Action in the initialize() method. In a later tutorial, I’ll give an example of doing this. NOTE: It is worth to note that you must handle the context in the initialize() method. You should do this by

parent::initialize($context);

You also need to return a TRUE or FALSE based on the success of the initialization. By default it is TRUE.
isSecure ()

Does the action require security? TRUE if you do, FALSE otherwise. It is FALSE by default.
validate ()

This is used to manually validate input parameters instead of using a pre-progammed validator. This will also be explain later in the tutorial on validation.
Creating Your First Action

Now that we have an overview of the Action class, we can move forward to creating our first Action. For this example, there isn’t any request to be handled so we can set up a minimal Action.

In naming an action you must use this format Actionname Action.class.php where Actionname is what you are calling this particular action. When you declare your class, it also must have the class name in the same format Actionname Action. For this example, I chose to call this FirstAction.

When creating a new action, at the very least, there has to be an execute() method, even if it does nothing. Also, since we are displaying a non-request page, we don’t need to process any request. We tell the controller this with the getRequestMethods() method, by setting the return value to Request::NONE. Finally, we also need to tell the controller what the default view is going to be. We do this by returning View::SUCCESS in getDefaultView().

Here is what my FirstAction.class.php looks like. I basically just took my BLANKAction.class.php, renamed it to FirstAction.class.php, renamed the class to FirstAction, removed the methods I didn’t need and set the remaining 3 methods to match my needs.

class FirstAction extends Action
{
/**
* Execute any application/business logic for this action.
*/
public function execute ()
{
// we don’t need any data here because this action doesn’t serve
// any request methods, so the processing skips directly to the view
}

// ————————————————————————-

/**
* Retrieve the default view to be executed when a given request is not
* served by this action.
*/
public function getDefaultView ()
{
return View::SUCCESS;
}

// ————————————————————————-

/**
* Retrieve the request methods on which this action will process
* validation and execution.
*/
public function getRequestMethods ()
{
return Request::NONE;
}

You can also return a view from another module. You do this by passing an array with the view information intead of the standard View::INPUT. When you use this you create a two element array. The first element is the module name. The second element is which view you want. It cannot be just the Action name, but the Action name with the specific view.

Here’s an example:

class MyClass extends Action
{

function execute()
{

$returnView[0] = MyModule;
$returnView[1] = DoSomethingInput;
-or-
$returnView[1] = DoSomethingError;
-not-
$returnView[1] = DoSomething;

return $returnView
}
}

View

I’ll add more to this later, describing the View class.

The decorating Pattern

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Posted on 25th February 2017 by Jeff Rogers in Mojavi Project

,

Before we begin we wanted to provide a quick insight into some of the open source files that we use and came across a file extension DOTX which is native to MS Outlook using XML. This particular file type DOTX was instituted to secure the protocol in which MS was written only giving limited source to outside vendors. We give a brief update to help you understand the open source nature of Mojavi 3.0.

  • Enter Decorator
  • Insert Here: Slots
  • Let’s Decorate!
    • Creating a Global Template
    • Putting the ornaments up

Ever since Mojavi 3 was released earlier this year, people have been looking to create a flexible global templating solution. From using post filters to page controllers, people have been looking for a way to create simple and managable global templates that will allow for a great deal of flexibility without compromising the need for larges amount of duplicated code.

Enter Decorator

The Decorator design pattern, like every other pattern, is nothing more than a way to talk about a resuable concept, or pattern, that a programmer might encounter while coding applications. The Decorator pattern’s strength is it’s ability to serve as a wrapper for that particular object, while leaving objects like it in tact.

The Decorator pattern has been implemented in the View class, providing a number of new methods:

public function setSlot ($attributeName, $moduleName, $actionName)
public function setDecoratorDirectory ($directory)
public function isDecorator ()
protected function & getSlots ()
public function getDecoratorTemplate ()
public function getDecoratorDirectory ()
protected function & decorate (&$content)

Now a brief explanation of what each of these do:

  • setSlot – Creates a slot entry based upon the results of a specially controlled controller->forward()
  • setDecoratorTemplate – Sets the template that you’re going to use for your decorator. This method also automatically turns the decorator switch to true
  • isDecorator – returns true is setDecoratorTemplate has been called, otherwise false.
  • getSlots – Returns an array of the slots.
  • getDecoratorTemplate – Returns the decorator template.
  • getDecoratorDirectory – Returns the decorator directory.
  • decorate – A method that must be implemented in derivate Views.

Note: these functions are in View, so all derivates of View (ie PHPView) have access.

Insert Here: Slots

Slots is a new name for an old concept. More or less, slots serve as placeholders that can be populated by the results of a $controller->foward($mod, $act) call. And, as you can see, the setSlot method takes three parameters:

public function setSlot ($attributeName, $moduleName, $actionName)

The first parameter, $attributeName, serves as the name of the slot. The next two parameters will be used to get the results of that Action, put it in a buffer, and place it into the internal $slots memeber variable.

Let’s Decorate!

The usage pattern of Views changes little with the implementation of the decorator pattern at the module level (though secondary View authors, ie SmartyView et al, do have a few things to play with).

Now let’s look at what you’re going to need to do implement the new, and NEW decorator features of Mojavi.

Creating a Global Template

First off, we’re going to need a great big christma..ehh..template to decorate. While I won’t get into breaking down and factoring our global template, keep in mind that this is not the only way to do this.

Example 2: The Christmas Tree (myGlobalTemplate.php)

Side note: Sometimes you'll have issues with that <?xml [....] ?> declaration, an easy
workaround is to disable short tags in your php.ini file, or to use ini_set() to disable
 it.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="iso-8859-1"?>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.1//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml11/DTD/xhtml11.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xml:lang="en-us">

<head>

    <title><?php echo $template['title']; ?></title>

    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="application/xhtml+xml; charset=utf-8"/>
    <style type="text/css" media="all">

        <!--Css slot-->
        <?php echo $template['css']; ?>

    </style>

</head>

<body>

<!--menu slot-->
<div id="menu">

<?php echo $template['menu']; ?>

</div>

<!--main content slot-->
<div id="main">

<?php echo $template['content']; ?>

</div>

</body>
</html>

Putting the ornaments up

So now that we have our decorator template, we need to decorate it. The decorating process is fairly simple, and consists of the following simple steps:

  • Setting the decorator directory using setDecoratorDirectory() (Optional)
  • Setting the decorator template using setDecoratorTemplate()
  • Setting slots setSlot()

For example,

Example 3: In the View (IndexSuccessView.class.php)

class IndexSuccessView extends PHPView
{

    public function execute ()
    {

        // set our template
        $this->setTemplate('IndexSuccess.php');

        //setup our decorator template
        $this->setDecoratorDirectory(MO_TEMPLATE_DIR);
        $this->setDecoratorTemplate('myGlobalTemplate.php');

        //setup our slots
        //(SlotName, Module, Action)
        $this->setSlot('menu', 'Content', 'PopulateMenu');
        $this->setSlot('css', 'Content', 'PopulateCss');

        // set the title
        $this->setAttribute('title', 'Default Action');

    }

}

Now you might be wondering where the content slot is being populated. Well, content is a reserved slot that is automatically populated with the output of the originally requested Action/View pair. So in the end for file extension DOTX type coding you will need to have the right drivers in order to help your various programs communicate.

To be Continued..

Where to start with Mojavi 3

0 comments

Posted on 25th February 2017 by Jeff Rogers in Mojavi Project

In order for Mojavi to continue we are looking for a few good web programmers to help with the last programming pieces and contribute to the forum. There are tons of web developer jobs that are currently available online and we know that many are well paid positions. Because this is an open source code this would be for the good of the development community.
Finally, there are a couple of ways you can test this module. The first and quickest way is just to instruct the controller using the url. Just add the module and action. Here’s what it would look like http://yourserver.com/index.php?module=Test&action=First.The second way is by changing the default module in the settings.ini file in the webapp/config directory.

Under [.actions] you will find the default module. Find the following two lines and change the default module and action.

DEFAULT_MODULE = “Default”
DEFAULT_ACTION = “Index”

After you change the default module and action it should look like this

DEFAULT_MODULE = “Test”
DEFAULT_ACTION = “First”
You are now ready to test your code. Just point your browser to the index.php and see the fruit of your labor. Contributing Author By Richard D Shank